Hans Rausing and the rich

Hans Rausing: Britain's richest man dances through the loopholes in tax law

The Guardian, April 11 2002

The richest man in Britain has used so many loopholes in UK tax law that he has not only saved himself millions of pounds in potential tax but, in at least one year, he and his UK businesses ended up receiving more money from the Treasury than they handed over.

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Hans Rausing: how the numbers add up

The Guardian, April 11 2002

Spending by Hans Rausing and his three adult children on the purchase and improvement of their homes in the UK, followed by figures on the money that Rausing gives to and takes from the UK government.

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Britain's gift to the world's wealthiest people: the 'non-dom' rule.

The Guardian, April 11 2002

The non-domicile rule is a distant echo of empire. It allows some residents of the UK to cite some other country as their real domicile and then, unlike all other residents, to pay UK tax on their earnings in the rest of the world only if they 'remit' the money to the UK.

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How the rich run rings around the taxman

The Guardian, April 12 2002

Gordon Brown may want to keep a close eye on Mohammed Al-Fayed. In particular, he may want to watch the legal action which the controversial owner of Harrods launched last year against the Inland Revenue. There are people in Whitehall who say it may take the lid off another scandal involving gross tax avoidance by the rich.

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The rich manoeuvre to protect their tax breaks

The Guardian, April 13 2002

Foreign millionaires have launched a furious lobbying campaign to protect the non-domicile loophole which saves them millions of pounds in tax each year while their accountants have started a rearguard action to shift their wealth so that Gordon Brown cannot tax it, even if he does change the law.

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The magical world of Hans Rausing and the taxman

The Daily Mirror, April 17 2002

Hans Rausing has lived a fairy tale life. His home is a palace. His own private valley dips down through the trees to his own private lake. Inside, he walks on marble floors. In his strong room, he keeps silver plates and golden coins and whole hogs of bacon, because it is conveniently cool in there. And he is as rich as a dream.

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Court declares secret tax deals for the rich are unlawful

The Guardian, June 1 2002

A secret Inland Revenue strategy which for years has allowed some of the wealthiest people in Britain to escape paying their full potential tax bills, was in tatters last night after a senior High Court judge declared that it was unlawful.

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Gordon Brown is beaten back by the rich

The Guardian, October 14 2002

Wealthy foreigners in the UK are celebrating a first-round victory in their battle to stop Gordon Brown closing the non-domicile tax loophole which allows them to avoid paying millions of pounds in UK tax each year.

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Honouring the tax avoider

The Guardian, April 24 2006
with Rob Evans

Hans Rausing, the Swedish billionaire whose tax arrangements were revealed by the Guardian, is among scores of foreign citizens awarded official honours in the last year. Rausing, former head of Tetra Pak, who has lived in England since 1982, was awarded an honorary knighthood in January.

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