Exposing the hacking scandal

This is the original investigation of the phone-hacking scandal - nearly a hundred stories running from the first Guardian splash in July 2009 to the political fallout from the big eruption in July 2011 with the news that Murdoch's paper had hacked the voicemail of the murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler.

You are viewing the category Exposing the hacking scandal. This category contains 97 articles and the sub-categories:

Steve Whittamore

Jonathan Rees

Murdoch's £1m bill for hiding dirty tricks

The Guardian, July 9 2009
The news story which kicked off the scandal

Rupert Murdoch's News Group Newspapers has paid out more than £1m to settle legal cases that threatened to reveal evidence of his journalists' repeated involvement in the use of criminal methods to get stories.

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How News of the World journalists broke the law

The Guardian, July 9 2009
Background detail for the opening news story

When the high court last summer ordered the News of the World to pay damages to Max Mosley for secretly filming him with prostitutes, the paper was furious. In an angry leader column, it insisted that public figures must maintain standards. "It is not for the powerful and the influential to run to the courts to gag newspapers from publishing stories that are TRUE," it said. "This is all about the...

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DPP to review phone-hack decisions

The Guardian, July 10 2009
with David Leigh

The director of public prosecutions, Keir Starmer, last night set up a team to conduct "an urgent examination of the material that was supplied by the police to the CPS" in the 2006 News of the World court case. It is alleged that evidence was suppressed of systematic corporate illegality by News International, as a single, so-called "rogue reporter", Clive Goodman, and a private detective...

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News of the World heard messages from Ferguson and Shearer

The Guardian, July 10 2009

The Manchester United manager, Sir Alex Ferguson, and the former Newcastle United manager, Alan Shearer, are among those whose private telephone messages were recorded by a private investigator working for the News of the World, according to sources familiar with the police investigation.

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Second phone-hack victim named

The Guardian, July 11 2009

The Guardian can disclose today the identity of a second person to whom the News of the World's owners have paid secret damages, following the hacking of her phone. She is Jo Armstrong, a legal adviser at the Professional Footballers Association.

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Clifford leads phone-hack legal actions

The Guardian, July 14 2009

The celebrity publicist Max Clifford is starting a legal action against the News of the World to uncover any role which its journalists may have played in intercepting messages left on his mobile phone.

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Phone-hack charges 'were only a sample'

The Guardian, July 17 2009
with David Leigh

Prosecutors evaluating evidence in the 2006 royal phone-hacking case were faced with so many potential offences that they deliberately limited the number of charges to prevent the inquiry becoming "unmanageable", a statement from Keir Starmer, the director of public prosecutions, said last night.

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Phone-hack evidence was never passed to prosecutors

The Guardian, July 21 2009

Scotland Yard will come under fresh pressure today to reopen its inquiry into phone-hacking and the News of the World after prosecutors said that they were never handed a document that appeared to implicate one of the paper's senior staff.

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What have they forgotten - and when did they forget it?

The Guardian, July 22 2009

The News of the World has finally found a story it can't crack. Its former editor, current editor, managing editor and in-house lawyer took it in turns yesterday to confess their failure to find answers to the most important questions which still surround the phone-hacking affair.

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Naming the victims of media spying

The Guardian, August 30 2009

The Guardian today reveals the identities of scores of public figures whose confidential details were extracted from supposedly secure databases by a network of private investigators working for news organisations.

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How the media broke into confidential databases

The Guardian, August 30 2009

From his cramped office at the back of his family home on a quiet street in New Milton on the Hampshire coast, Steve Whittamore worked for years as the link between news organisations and a network of sources who could penetrate the security of confidential databases.

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The PCC give themselves a black eye

The Guardian, November 8 2009
Following publication of the Press Complaints Commission inquiry into phone-hacking at the News of the World

If you write news stories, you know sometimes they’ll be attacked. But this is the weirdest attack I’ve experienced in 33 years of writing: the Press Complaints Commission has thrown plenty of punches from different directions but not one single one has hit the target. In spite of all the angry language, there is not a single factual claim in our story about the News of the World that has been...

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Phone-hacking - a hundred more victims

The Guardian, February 1 2010

Three leading mobile phone companies have told the Guardian that they have discovered a total of more than a hundred customers whose voicemail was accessed by the private investigator and the journalist at the centre of the phone-hacking scandal at the News of the World.

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Clifford may be offered cash to drop his 'hacking' case

The Guardian, February 17 2010

The News of the World is believed to be planning to settle a court case which threatens to disclose further evidence of the involvement of its ­journalists in illegal information-gathering by private investigators.

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Coulson used four private investigators who broke the law

The Guardian, February 24 2010
Breaking the story of Jonathan Rees' work for the NoW without being able to name him

David Cameron's communications director, Andy Coulson, will today come under fresh pressure to defend his editorship of the News of the World and his knowledge about the illegal activities of his journalists amid new allegations about the paper's involvement with private detectives who broke the law.

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The strange case of Mr A and the editor who saw nothing

The Guardian, February 24 2010

When David Cameron's media adviser, Andy Coulson, was asked last July about his experience as a journalist with the various forms of illegal activity which are said to have occurred in Fleet Street's newsrooms, he answered clearly: "I have never had any involvement in it at all."

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Clifford takes £1m and drops his phone-hacking case

The Guardian, March 10 2010

The News of the World last night was accused of buying silence in the phone-hacking scandal after they agreed to pay more than £1 million to persuade the celebrity PR agent Max Clifford to drop his legal action over the interception of his voicemail messages.

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Police ignored evidence of 'vast' phone-hacking

The Guardian, April 5 2010

Police who investigated the phone-hacking scandal at the News of the World obtained previously undisclosed telephone records which showed that 'a vast number' of public figures had had their voicemail accessed - and then decided not to pursue the evidence, according to official papers seen by the Guardian.

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Are Scotland Yard scared of Rupert Murdoch?

The Guardian, April 6 2010

Something very worrying has been going on at Scotland Yard. We now know that in dealing with the phone-hacking affair at the News of the World, they cut short their original inquiry; supressed evidence; misled the public and the press; concealed information and broke the law. Why?

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Phone-hack inquiry into John Terry stories

The Guardian, April 10 2010

An official inquiry has been launched into the suspected interception of voicemail messages around the tabloid newspaper story of the England football captain, John Terry, and his alleged affair with a French model.

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New phone-hack evidence puts pressure on Coulson

The Guardian, May 4 2010

David Cameron's close adviser, Andy Coulson, last night came under ferocious attack after the disclosure of new evidence of the News of the World's role in the illegal interception of the royal household's voicemail messages during his time as editor.

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Coulson "encouraged" hacking, claims New York Times

The Guardian, September 1 2010

The Prime Minister's media adviser, Andy Coulson, freely discussed the use of illegal news-gathering techniques when he was editor of the News of the World and 'actively encouraged' a named reporter to engage in the illegal interception of voicemail messages, according to allegations published last night by the New York Times.

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News of the World suspends a reporter in new hacking row

The Guardian, September 2 2010
with Vikram Dodd and Nicholas Watt

The government last night came under pressure to set up a judicial inquiry into the phone hacking scandal at the News of the World after the paper confirmed that it has suspended a journalist while it investigates new allegations of the unlawful interception of voicemail.

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Pressure builds on Coulson

The Guardian, September 5 2010
with Patrick Wintour

News International and David Cameron's PR chief, Andy Coulson, face the prospect of a fresh parliamentary inquiry into phone-hacking by the News of the World after Labour MPs said they plan to press for the issue to be referred to the powerful standards and privileges committee of the House of Commons.
...

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