Politicians obstructing justice

A blue light wrapped in red tape: how central government obstructs police for political gain

The Guardian, July 11 2003

David Blunkett has not been getting on too well with his chief constables. Last autumn, for example, the Home Secretary unveiled his brand new National Policing Plan, which is to guide the 43 constabularies of England and Wales in all their efforts to deal with crime and disorder.

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Planning to produce plans about planning - the heart of modern policing

The Guardian, July 11 2003

The National Policing Plan runs to fifty six pages and requires all forty three police forces in England and Wales to produce three-year plans which incorporate: ten Public Service Agreements with seventeen key performance indicators; four strategic priorities with ten core actions, seventeen local actions and nineteen more key performance indicators; six performance domains with twenty one Best...

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Street Crime - how Tony Blair fiddled the figures to claim success

The Guardian, July 11 2003

In April last year, Tony Blair launched a crusade against street crime. He personally chaired eight meetings of ministers and chief constables, which chose to spend £261 million on a concerted drive to arrest, try and convict street thieves in the ten forces where the problem was worst. Blair assigned a minister to each of the ten forces and made it their personal responsibility to deliver...

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Government prefers not to stop police cheating victims of crime

The Guardian, July 11 2003

Here is a safe bet: at some point in the future, there will be a major scandal in this country when police are exposed for submitting fictitious reports of their work; specifically, we will discover that they have been cheating in their recording of crime and cheating in their claims to be detecting it.

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The senior judge who wants less punishment for criminals

The Guardian, August 17 2005

The retiring lord chief justice, Lord Woolf, today makes a passionate plea for a new approach to law and order which would see a major shift away from punishment towards the solution of problems which generate crime.

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