Defective detecting and pointless punishment

System failure: How to lose the fight for law and order

The Guardian, July 10 2003

Right there. That's where they got the Yardie guy. He was in that pub, the Jolly Roger, over on the corner of All Hallows Road and, although it's dark now and our van is racing, we can still catch a glimpse of the lamplit pavement where he lay with his blood pooling over the kerb and onto the tarmac street.

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The real roots of crime (which lie far beyond the reach of the system)

The Guardian, July 10 2003

They hanged Huffum White in August 1813. When he was offered a last wish, Huffum told the priest he'd quite like somebody else please to take his place on the scaffold, but criminal justice had its way with him and celebrated a great achievement: they had just hanged the last highwayman in England. In truth, it was no achievement at all.

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Lies, damned lies and crime statistics

The Guardian, July 10 2003

The trouble with crime is that it's illegal. Which means it's secret. Which means that all the king's forces and all the king's men and women at every level of every criminal justice agency in the country don't really know what's happening.

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The senior judge who wants less punishment for criminals

The Guardian, August 17 2005

The retiring lord chief justice, Lord Woolf, today makes a passionate plea for a new approach to law and order which would see a major shift away from punishment towards the solution of problems which generate crime.

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