Scandal of the Jamaican Yardies

How detectives shielded a Yardie from justice

The Guardian, November 6 1995

A Jamaican 'Yardie' gangster who committed a spectacular armed robbery in Nottingham was shielded from justice by London detectives who had been using him as an informant. Senior Yard officers even attempted to abort his trial before the Director of Public Prosecutions and the Attorney General intervened personally and insisted that it should go ahead.

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Eaton Green - the Yardie grass who was allowed to commit crime

The Guardian, November 6 1995

Just before two o'clock in the afternoon on Thursday July 8, 1993, a slim young black man with a scar across his right cheek was walking down Mandela Road in Newham, east London when a group of detectives surrounded him, handcuffed him and arrested him for possession of firearms and conspiracy to rob. It was, by the standards of policing in the 1990s, an apparently unimportant event.

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Police suppress evidence of murders by their Yardie grass

The Guardian, May 1 1996

A secret police operation to procure a new supergrass has blown up in Scotland Yard's face leaving officers accused of suppressing evidence of serious crimes including murder. They have also opened the door to the release of dangerous gunmen from British prisons.

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Revealed: more Yardie gangsters who came to UK as guests of police

The Guardian, February 3 1997

Police and immigration officers have allowed dangerous foreign gangsters to stay illegally in the United Kingdom in order to persuade them to become informers. In some cases, they have gone on to commit serious crimes against British citizens, including rape, robbery and murder.

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"Almost complete breakdown" in London's response to Yardies

The Guardian, February 3 1997

Marcia Lawes was 24 years old. She lived in a small flat in a quiet street on the edge of Brixton in south London with her two-year-old son, Cassius, and her baby daughter, Malika. She had no work and she had no partner and in the past she had suffered from a crippling depression, but she stayed in touch with her family, particularly with her elder sister, Mercy, and she was beginning to make a...

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A Yardie walks free

The Guardian, May 1 1997

A Jamaican Yardie gunman who was jailed for 14 years for his part in a spectacular armed robbery is expected to walk free from the Court of Appeal today after Scotland Yard conceded that one of their most highly prized informers had lied in evidence against him.

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Official report on the Yardie informer scandal

The Guardian, February 16 1999

One of the biggest inquiries ever conducted into a complaint against police has confirmed Guardian reports of chaotic management and law-breaking in the relationship between London detectives and Jamaican Yardie gangsters who were working as police informers.

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System failure: How to lose the fight for law and order

The Guardian, July 10 2003

Right there. That's where they got the Yardie guy. He was in that pub, the Jolly Roger, over on the corner of All Hallows Road and, although it's dark now and our van is racing, we can still catch a glimpse of the lamplit pavement where he lay with his blood pooling over the kerb and onto the tarmac street.

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