Australia

Australia's porn merchants screw up the law

The Melbourne Age, February 11 1995

Some years ago in California, a man calling himself Bill Majors took a young woman with long blonde hair to his house, stripped her, cuffed her hands behind her back, chained her ankles to a mechanical hoist and hauled her up until she hung upside down from the ceiling. "Ask me to hit you," he said.
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Melbourne doctors challenge state with euthanasia confession

The Melbourne Age, March 25 1995

Seven Melbourne doctors have written an open letter to the state premier, Mr Jeff Kennett, openly declaring that they have helped terminally ill patients to die - a criminal offence which carries a sentence of up to 14 years in jail.
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Pleading for her death - the moving letters of a woman in search of euthanasia

The Melbourne Age, March 25 1995

Anna Knight knew what she wanted. She had always been a strong character and when she realised just how ill she was - when she had survived three operations in only 10 weeks and emerged with a bowel full of stitches, a colostomy and the certainty that she would die from the inoperable cancer that was slowly chewing up her abdomen - she spoke to her elderly husband and to her adult daughter and she...

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Good and old - the hotel that dares to be different

The Melbourne Age, May 6 1995

The future is not what it used to be. Fifty years ago, people could imagine a world that simply became better and better in every way. It was progress. It was bound to happen. Of course, it didn't. This is true not only on the grand scale of poverty and pollution and the commercialisation of everything, but also in the details of life - the leather coat that turns out to be plastic, the fresh food...

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How the monarchy became a bad joke in Australia

The Guardian, February 29 1996

Just over 30 years ago, the Queen visited the small town of Elizabeth, a sprawling maze of tarmac and redbrick bungalows about 30 kilometres north of Adelaide. The pavements along her route were lined six-deep with families slowly burning in the sun. The town square was packed. The council had spent weeks planning the visit, it had closed all the schools and some of the offices and, when the...

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The Australian Thatcher

The Guardian, March 9 1996

Imagine for a moment that a newly-elected right-wing government announced that in order to attract lucrative business to London, they had decided to stage an international Grand Prix motor race in the capital and that without consultation they had chosen as its site the previously peaceful, almost rural surroundings of Hampstead Heath.

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Discovering Australia (and the secret life of the Kingfisher man)

The Guardian, May 11 1996

It is early morning on the Murray river up on the northern border of the state of Victoria. Every so often, a gang of bright white cockatoos comes crashing out of the tree tops, screaming abuse at each other on their way across the water, but otherwise the river and the forest are deeply silent as Bill Vickers pushes his boat upstream.

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The stolen children

The Guardian, May 25 1996

When Archie Roach was a small child in the early 1950s, he lived in a place called Framlingham, a short row of tin shacks and little brick houses which stood on a dusty, dry plateau near the edge of a gorge about 300 miles west of Melbourne. Once, his family had lived by a riverbank, where they could hunt and catch fresh fish, but the white people had come and ordered all of them - Archie and his...

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